The Cabin In The Woods sees release on DVD today, and this is one horror film you don’t want to miss. It follows five stereotypical characters as they set out to spend a week away in an old wooden cabin in the middle of some woods.
But this film comes with a twist - these characters are being watched, and their surroundings are being manipulated, as they are forced into scenarios typical of the genre, with the aim of ‘appeasing’ an unseen threat.
Whilst at first glance it may seem like any other slasher horror, this is a film with heart and spirit. Satirical, and darkly comical, The Cabin In The Woods is best served in a dark room with four good friends…
★★★★

The Cabin In The Woods sees release on DVD today, and this is one horror film you don’t want to miss. It follows five stereotypical characters as they set out to spend a week away in an old wooden cabin in the middle of some woods.

But this film comes with a twist - these characters are being watched, and their surroundings are being manipulated, as they are forced into scenarios typical of the genre, with the aim of ‘appeasing’ an unseen threat.

Whilst at first glance it may seem like any other slasher horror, this is a film with heart and spirit. Satirical, and darkly comical, The Cabin In The Woods is best served in a dark room with four good friends…

TAGS:   Film.   Review.   The Cabin In The Woods.   Drew Goddard.   Kristen Connolly.   Chris Hemsworth.   Fran Kranz.   4.

As Olympic fever sets to take over the country, The Hidden City looks at how this most-anticipated of events affects our own city.

The School Olympics is a scheme running throughout nineteen primary schools across Handsworth in Birmingham. Each school competes as a different country, taking part in eighteen different sporting events, in the hope of winning the prized medals for their efforts.

From the simple impact of the values being added to the curriculum, to the wider excitement generated by the sporting events themselves, the Handsworth School Olympics has brought together a community in the wake of the worlds biggest sporting event in the UK’s history.

Production: Jessica Goodman
Additional Footage: Tina Chow, Jessica Goodman, Deanna Picknell, Charlotte Price, Amy Roberts, Nerissa Sharman, Hayley Webster, Hollie Woodfield.

(Source: thehiddencity.net)

TAGS:   Olympic.   School Olympics.   Handsworth.   Handsworth School Olympics.   Eddie Wedderburn.   The Hidden City.   Published.   video.   interview.

The Electric Cinema owner, Tom Lawes, talks about the motivation behind his film, The Last Projectionist.

TAGS:   Film.   Interview.   The Last Projectionist.   The Electric Cinema.   The Electric.   Tom Lawes.

The Electric in Birmingham is the UKs oldest working cinema. It screened its first film on 27th December 1909, and has been providing various forms of entertainment to the public ever since.

It has been brought from a state of dereliction to one of the most adored cinemas in the country. Now a fully-functioning picture house and a licenced bar, the establishment is rich in history and prided by the city.

We were granted the opportunity to take an inside look at the venue with the man who made The Electric what it is today, and find out just why it matters so much that places like this are kept alive.

Production: Jessica Goodman
Photography: Dan Johnson and Tom Lawes

(Source: thehiddencity.net, via coffeeandcds)

TAGS:   The Electric Cinema.   The Electric.   The Hidden City.   Published.   video.   Interview.

Prometheus, set to be released next summer, showcases director Ridley Scott’s return to the genre he helped create, and today, the first trailer went live. Whilst it gives away little in terms of narrative, it offers a stylistic look at the film that harkens back to the days of Alien. Just how linked these two films are, however, remains unknown. What do you think of it?

TAGS:   Film.   Anticipated.   Trailer.   Prometheus.   Ridley Scott.

A full trailer for The Dark Knight Rises finally surfaced online this week. At just over two minutes in length, it offers viewers a glance at the characters of Bane and Catwoman, as well as displaying a host of special affects. With a promotional run that began over a year before the films scheduled release date, this is easily one of the most anticipated films of the next year. 

(Source: leatherjacketlovesong)

TAGS:   Film.   Anticipated.   The Dark Knight Rises.   Christopher Nolan.   Christian Bale.   Michael Caine.   Tom Hardy.   Anne Hathaway.   Marion Cotillard.   Joseph Gordon-Levitt.   Gary Oldman.   Batman.
Lifetripper is a short film detailing a glimpse into the day-to-day life of an everyday working man. Stunningly shot, and lovingly composed, this film is humorous and touching in equal measures. 
Rob Benedict plays Stan, a single father and mechanic, whose daily conversations and routine lead him to unearthing a comedic flair. The monotonous tone of work and the slow pace of home life juxtapose perfectly with fast paced conversation and the bright lights of stand up comedy.
This tale of an average life, a search for something more, is artfully told and beautifully portrayed. Bitter-sweet, and funny in places, at only fifteen minutes in length, there is no reason that this film should be missed.
★★★★

Lifetripper is a short film detailing a glimpse into the day-to-day life of an everyday working man. Stunningly shot, and lovingly composed, this film is humorous and touching in equal measures. 

Rob Benedict plays Stan, a single father and mechanic, whose daily conversations and routine lead him to unearthing a comedic flair. The monotonous tone of work and the slow pace of home life juxtapose perfectly with fast paced conversation and the bright lights of stand up comedy.

This tale of an average life, a search for something more, is artfully told and beautifully portrayed. Bitter-sweet, and funny in places, at only fifteen minutes in length, there is no reason that this film should be missed.

TAGS:   Short Film.   Review.   Lifetripper.   Rob Benedict.   Aleksandra Kaniak.   Kaden Billin.   Graeme Joyce.   4.

Shame is the latest film to come from the actor/director duo Michael Fassbender and Steve McQueen. It follows the life of a sex addict [Fassbender], as his wayward sister imposes herself into his life, and things change in ways that neither of them would have comprehended. With a showing set for 25th Leeds International Film Festival next month, this is one release that should not be missed.

TAGS:   Anticipated.   Film.   Shame.   For mature audiences only.   Michael Fassbender.   Steve McQueen.
Melancholia is the latest film from controversial director Lars Von Trier, telling the tale of two sisters in the wake of an apocalypse, as a mysterious new planet propels directly towards Earth. The film is divided into two distinct chapters. The first focuses on Justine (Kirsten Dunst), as she battles through her own wedding reception, and eventually sabotages it. The second follows Claire (Charlotte Gainsbourg) as she struggles to come to terms with what the appearance of the unknown planet means.
This is not about the end of the world, this is about people. The opening moments show exactly how the film will end; a series of breathtaking images highlighting the beauty in disaster. The first chapter contains some (strikingly honest) laughable sequences that lift the mood - such as the difficulties maneuvering a limousine up a winding dirt track - and whilst the second chapter doesn’t quite live up to that, the films style and elegance, along with its astounding conclusion, draws into question what really matters, and what - if anything - would remain if it all vanished. With Melancholia, Von Trier manages to achieve a balance of style and substance that makes the film both enchanting and entertaining to watch. 
★★★★

Melancholia is the latest film from controversial director Lars Von Trier, telling the tale of two sisters in the wake of an apocalypse, as a mysterious new planet propels directly towards Earth. The film is divided into two distinct chapters. The first focuses on Justine (Kirsten Dunst), as she battles through her own wedding reception, and eventually sabotages it. The second follows Claire (Charlotte Gainsbourg) as she struggles to come to terms with what the appearance of the unknown planet means.

This is not about the end of the world, this is about people. The opening moments show exactly how the film will end; a series of breathtaking images highlighting the beauty in disaster. The first chapter contains some (strikingly honest) laughable sequences that lift the mood - such as the difficulties maneuvering a limousine up a winding dirt track - and whilst the second chapter doesn’t quite live up to that, the films style and elegance, along with its astounding conclusion, draws into question what really matters, and what - if anything - would remain if it all vanished. With Melancholia, Von Trier manages to achieve a balance of style and substance that makes the film both enchanting and entertaining to watch. 

TAGS:   Film.   Review.   Melancholia.   Lars Von Trier.   Kirsten Dunst.   Charlotte Gainsbourg.   Kiefer Sutherland.   Alexander Skarsgård.   John Hurt.   Stellan Skarsgård.   4.
Attack The Block is the first feature film from director Joe Cornish, and its premise is this; an unknown species of alien starts to invade earth - South London to be precise - and the only people that stand in its way are a group of inner city teenagers fighting to defend their block. What sounds ridiculous is actually a rollercoaster ride of thrills, chills, and comedy, set against a beautifully portrayed urban landscape.
Despite its distinctive camera work, striking cinematography, and stellar performances from the cast, Attack The Block fails to be more than style over substance. The action kicks off all too fast; before the audience is fully introduced to the characters, they’re already immersed in the conflict that makes up the plot. Perhaps this is a film that improves with viewings, and though enjoyable, single showing can leave viewers slightly disappointed. 
★★

Attack The Block is the first feature film from director Joe Cornish, and its premise is this; an unknown species of alien starts to invade earth - South London to be precise - and the only people that stand in its way are a group of inner city teenagers fighting to defend their block. What sounds ridiculous is actually a rollercoaster ride of thrills, chills, and comedy, set against a beautifully portrayed urban landscape.

Despite its distinctive camera work, striking cinematography, and stellar performances from the cast, Attack The Block fails to be more than style over substance. The action kicks off all too fast; before the audience is fully introduced to the characters, they’re already immersed in the conflict that makes up the plot. Perhaps this is a film that improves with viewings, and though enjoyable, single showing can leave viewers slightly disappointed. 

TAGS:   Film.   Review.   Attack The Block.   John Boyega.   Jodie Whittaker.   Nick Frost.   Luke Treadaway.   2.